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Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High

Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High finds that drivers in British Columbia pay higher rates, in part, because ICBC doesn’t fully account for age when setting rates, so older, safer drivers pay more to subsidize younger, riskier drivers, who pay less than they otherwise would. Also, ICBC uses driver premiums to pay for non-insurance related costs—such as driver testing, driver and vehicle licensing and fine collection—which also drive up costs.

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Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, 2018 finds that Canada spends more on health care than a majority of 28 comparable countries with universal coverage, but ranks near the bottom in terms of the number of physicians and hospital beds, and Canada suffers from the longest wait times.

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The Costs of the Canadian Government's Reconciliation Framework for First Nations

The Costs of the Canadian Government’s Reconciliation Framework for First Nations finds that settling ongoing litigation with First Nations could cost the federal government $5.7 billion over the next five years. That’s in addition to federal spending on First Nations, which itself increased from $8.2 billion in 2015/16 to more than $10 billion this year.

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The United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement: Overview and Outlook

The United States-Mexico-Canada-Agreement: Overview and Outlook finds that the new trade deal to replace NAFTA represents a missed opportunity to create freer trade across North America. Not only does the new agreement leave intact protections in many sectors—to the detriment of Canadians—but when it comes to the North American auto sector, the USMCA introduces much more managed trade, even imposing limits on how many automobiles (and auto parts) Canada and Mexico will send into the United States.

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Economic Freedom of North America 2018

Economic Freedom of North America 2018 finds that Florida has overtaken New Hampshire as the most economically free state in the U.S., having scored 7.87 out of 10 in this year’s report, which measures government spending, taxation and labour market restrictions. Rounding out the top five freest states are Texas (3rd), Tennessee (4th) and South Dakota (5th). For the fourth year in a row, New York was ranked least free (50th), followed by Kentucky (49th), West Virginia (48th), California (47th) and Alaska (46th).

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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario finds that public-sector employees in Ontario—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 10.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

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Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta

Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta finds that the province’s investment attractiveness has diminished in the eyes of oil, gas and mining executives, primarily due to the province’s increasing regulatory burden. Specifically, environmental regulations and the cost of complying with Alberta’s red tape are increasingly cited as reasons not to invest in the province.

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Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence

Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence outlines how other jurisdictions—for example, British Columbia in 2001 and the federal government in 2015—successfully reduced outdated regulations. Best practices include broad public consultations to identify regulations for elimination, requiring a net reduction of existing regulations, and specifically tasking an independent agency or government department to reduce regulations.